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Theories and Contexts of Jewish-Muslim Relations

Nov 5, 2020 10:00 AM in Eastern Time (US and Canada)

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Speakers

Bryan Cheyette
Professor of Modern Literature and Culture at the University of Reading
Bryan Cheyette is Professor of Modern Literature and Culture at the University of Reading. He has teaching and research interests in late-nineteenth, twentieth and twenty-first century literature, modernism and politics, fiction and ethnicity, postcolonial literature and theory, British-Jewish literature, theories of “race” and modernity, and Holocaust testimony. He is the editor or author of ten books most recently The Ghetto: A Very Short Introduction (Oxford University Press, 2020) and Diasporas of the Mind: Jewish/Postcolonial Writing and the Nightmare of History (Yale University Press, 2013).
Yulia Egorova
Professor of Anthropology at Durham University
Yulia Egorova is Professor of Anthropology at Durham University, where she is also the director of the Centre for the Study of Jewish Culture, Society and Politics. Her research interests include anthropology of Jewish communities, and constructions of minority identities. She is currently working on a project exploring debates about antisemitism and Islamophobia in the UK. She is the author of several books, including most recently Jews and Muslims in South Asia: Reflections on Difference, Religion and Race (Oxford University Press, 2018).
Jonathan Glasser
Associate Professor of Anthropology at the College of William & Mary
Jonathan Glasser is Associate Professor of Anthropology at the College of William & Mary. His work focuses on modern North Africa, with particular attention to Algeria and Morocco. He is the author of The Lost Paradise: Andalusi Music in Urban North Africa (University of Chicago Press, 2016). His current project looks at Muslim-Jewish interactions around music and poetry in Algeria and its diaspora in the early modern and modern periods.